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Chris Muir

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Apache Ivy and JDeveloper Integration

In the Java world there are a few well-known tools for dependency management

As software applications grow, a common technique to reduce the complexity is to break the overall solution into separately built and deployed modules. This allows each component to be worked on independently without being overwhelmed with detail, though the cost of reassembling and building the application is the trade off for the added flexibility. When modules become reusable across applications the reassembly and build problem is exasperated and it becomes essential to track which version of each module is required against each application. Such problems can be reduced by the introduction of dependency management tools.

In the Java world there are a few well-known tools for dependency management including Apache Ivy and Apache Maven. Strictly speaking Ivy is just a dependency management tool which integrates with Apache Ant, while Maven is a set of tools of where dependency management is but just one of its specialties.

In the ADF world thanks to the inclusion of ADF Libraries (aka. modules) that can be shared across applications, dependency management is also a relevant problem. Recently I went through the exercise of including Apache Ivy into our JDeveloper 11g and Hudson mix for an existing set of applications. This blog post attempts to describe the configuration of Apache Ivy in context of our JDeveloper setup in order to assist others setting up a similar installation. The blog post will introduce a simplistic application (downloadable from here) with 1 dependency to introduce the Ivy features, in very much an A-B-C style to assist the reader's learning.

Readers should be careful to note this post doesn't attempt to explain all the in's and out's of using Apache Ivy, just a successful configuration on our part. Readers are encouraged to seek out further resources to assist their learning of Apache Ivy.

Assumptions
This blog post assumes you understand the following concepts:

ADF Libraries
Resource palette
Apache Ant
ojdeploy

In the beginning there was... ah... ApplicationA
To start out with our overall application contains one JDeveloper application workspace known as ApplicationA, installed under C:/JDeveloper/mywork as follows:

ApplicationA initially has no dependencies and can be built and run standalone.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Chris Muir

Chris Muir, an Oracle ACE Director, senior developer and trainer, and frequent blogger at http://one-size-doesnt-fit-all.blogspot.com, has been hacking away as an Oracle consultant with Australia's SAGE Computing Services for too many years. Taking a pragmatic approach to all things Oracle, Chris has more recently earned battle scars with JDeveloper, Apex, OID and web services, and has some very old war-wounds from a dark and dim past with Forms, Reports and even Designer 100% generation. He is a frequent presenter and contributor to the local Australian Oracle User Group scene, as well as a contributor to international user group magazines such as the IOUG and UKOUG.